I see and use badly written software every day. Examples are all over the place. Yesterday I had to login to my pension provider system and they allow to pick your own username, but they HAVE to have it uppercase and prefix 001. Why? Who came up with this crappy restriction?

I’ve seen database structures where information about people was stored in table called _job. And information about jobs was in table _jobs. Just because.

And don’t get me started on home-grown user/password security solutions where you can only have passwords of maximum 8 characters. You see them everywhere.

And plain-text password storage? There is a ton of systems that do that. There is a dedicated shaming site Plain Text Offenders. It’s a poor state of industry when we have such sites.

I can go on forever about shitty software written by clue-less developers or pressed for time/requirements by even more clue-less managers. It is everywhere. But I realise the problem is with us. And we can fix it.

Next time you write any code – think a bit harder. Next time your manager comes up with some requirement that does not make sense – push against it a bit harder. Next time a clue-less developer comes to you (or on Stack Overflow) for advice – try a bit harder to explain the best practices. Next time you start a new tech-stack – read the docs a bit longer. Next time you hit a bug – write a regression unit test. Next time write better software.

  • Amro

    I agree with you, most of the time I get to work on a project with other developers, because I’m the senior(i mean real senior compared to them) and because my conscience doesn’t allow me, I get to spend much more hours mending the mistakes they do, their understanding of coding never crossed the basic samples they followed here or there, without having sense for how the software should be used or should work in real world.

    I found coders storing the login password in sessions, why would they even do that?

    • I think this is our job that we make sure the junior developers (in any sense) do know where they have made mistakes, so they don’t make the same ones later.

      I’ve also seen cookie “IsAdmin=true” that gave admin account to anyone logged in. That was a public site for a large organisation….